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Fort Cumberland

The storm tanks and combined sewer outfall here are an essential part of the catchment – it helps to protect the city from sewer flooding during heavy rainfall.

We’re replacing damaged sea defences next to the historical Fort Cumberland site in Eastney, Portsmouth.

The new sea defences will protect Fort Cumberland and two of our underground storm tanks, which are vital in helping to prevent flooding in the city. Large amounts of rock will be transported from Norway and positioned along the coastline to shore up the seawall.

At high tide, the rock armour will be offloaded into the sea opposite the damaged section of the sea wall and will then be retrieved and brought to the beach at low tide using construction vehicles. Before the works start, the existing broken sections of concrete sea defences will be crushed and removed.

We started the scheme in April 2017 and complete by October 2017, this is to avoid the wintering bird season.

Southern Water - Fort Cumberland site improvements
 

The small section of beach and grassland in Eastney, close to the small pier and our outfall pipe, will have to be closed for the duration of the works for health and safety reasons. We’re sorry about this but when it comes to the safety of the public, we can’t take any chances.

We’d ask you to keep dogs on leads while walking near this area and adhere to the safety signs. For more information please click here for FAQs.

Our Investment

In 2015, we completed a £10 million investment scheme to improve the resilience and robustness of its storm tanks at Fort Cumberland, Portsmouth.

The scheme has changed the way storm water – wastewater heavily diluted with rainwater – enters and then passes through the tanks and has also seen the pumps and screens refurbished.

These screens capture any debris within the storm water, which includes such items as wet wipes and sanitary waste, before screened storm water is released.

Protecting homes

It's important to note that the improvements will not stop stormwater releases into Langstone Harbour during heavy rain.

This emergency overflow for the sewer system is needed to protect homes and businesses from wastewater flooding. These releases occur only once the 40 million litre storm storage tanks are full. The vast majority of water released is rainwater.

Overflows, such as the one at Fort Cumberland, are agreed and regulated by the Environment Agency.

 
 
 
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